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The Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Hemodynamic and Neural Responses to Static Handgrip and Muscle Metaboreflex Activation

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dc.contributor.advisor Millar, Philip J
dc.contributor.author Incognito, Anthony Vincent
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-07T19:59:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-07T19:59:01Z
dc.date.copyright 2016-08
dc.date.created 2016-08-30
dc.date.issued 2016-09-07
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9964
dc.description.abstract This thesis investigated the effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC), a blood flow restriction procedure demonstrated to exert cytoprotection and reduce metabolic demand during ischemia-reperfusion injury, on hemodynamic and neural (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA) responses to static handgrip and muscle metaboreflex activation (post-exercise circulatory occlusion; PECO). Thirty-seven men were randomized to a sham (n=16) or IPC (n=21) group. Participants completed a 2 min static handgrip followed by 3 min of PECO, and a static handgrip time-to-failure to elicit peak responses. IPC had no effect on hemodynamics during static handgrip or PECO, but significantly increased peak systolic blood pressure. IPC had no effect on MSNA during PECO, but significantly increased total MSNA during the first minute of static handgrip and peak MSNA burst frequency and incidence. These findings suggest that IPC does not attenuate the muscle metaboreflex, however, may facilitate sympathetic activation at exercise onset and volitional fatigue. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship CIHR Fredrick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject static exercise en_US
dc.subject ischemic preconditioning en_US
dc.subject muscle sympathetic nerve activity en_US
dc.subject blood pressure en_US
dc.title The Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning on Hemodynamic and Neural Responses to Static Handgrip and Muscle Metaboreflex Activation en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
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