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In-Vitro Bioaccessibility and Stability of Beta-Carotene in Ethylcellulose Oleogels

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Title: In-Vitro Bioaccessibility and Stability of Beta-Carotene in Ethylcellulose Oleogels
Author: O'Sullivan, Chloe
Department: Department of Food Science
Program: Food Science
Advisor: Marangoni, Alejandro
Abstract: The in-vitro lipolysis and β-carotene (BC) transfer from oil to aqueous phase of canola oil ethylcellulose (EC) oleogels were measured using a static monocompartmental model simulating oral, gastric, and duodenal digestive stages. The effects of EC concentration and molecular weight on gel in-vitro digestibility were examined, using un-structured canola oil as a control. The physicochemical properties of oleogels containing BC were also measured. It was found that gels made with 10% 10 cP, 12% 10 cP, 14% 10 cP, and 10% 20 cP did not differ significantly in their extent of lipolysis or BC transfer compared to canola oil; however 10% 45 cP had a significantly lower extent of lipolysis and BC transfer compared to all other formulations. The structure and mechanical strength of the oleogels were both determined to be factors affecting lipolysis and transfer. The presence of BC did not significantly affect the mechanical strength of the gels and EC oleogelation delayed BC degradation under accelerated storage conditions compared to a heated canola oil control. These findings could contribute to the development of new applications for EC oleogels, specifically for the effective delivery of lipid soluble molecules.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9716
Date: 2016-05
Rights: Attribution 2.5 Canada
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Attribution 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 2.5 Canada