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PATH as Place: Exploring the Concept of Place in Toronto’s Grade-Separated Pedestrian Network

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Title: PATH as Place: Exploring the Concept of Place in Toronto’s Grade-Separated Pedestrian Network
Author: Stewart, Christian
Department: School of Environmental Design and Rural Development
Program: Landscape Architecture
Advisor: Perkins, Nathan
Abstract: This thesis is an investigation of the concept of place in relation to Toronto’s PATH network. Toronto’s extensive grade-separated PATH network is devoted entirely to pedestrians but is often derided as an example of a landscape that is disorienting and devoid of identity. Despite its heavy use, it is said to lack “place”. This exploration seeks to determine the extent of the PATH’s quality of place. To discover this a review of the literature was undertaken to define established place models and determine limitations in their applicability to this study. Themes derived from the literature were then applied to a photographic and historical analysis of the PATH. After a synthesis of the findings was performed the results showed the PATH’s sense of place is measurable, but its definition is nuanced and complex.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9659
Date: 2016-05


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