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Effects of Bacterial Endophytes from the Genus Zea on Non-Native Host Species in the Context of Application to Biological Weed Control

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Title: Effects of Bacterial Endophytes from the Genus Zea on Non-Native Host Species in the Context of Application to Biological Weed Control
Author: Harding, Dylan P.
Department: Department of Plant Agriculture
Program: Plant Agriculture
Advisor: Raizada, Manish N.
Abstract: The increasing prevalence of herbicide resistant weeds and cosmetic pesticide bans creates a need for novel control strategies. Endophytes, defined as microbes that inhabit plants without causing disease, may have antagonistic effects in non-native host plants. To test this hypothesis in the context of biological weed control, bacterial endophytes of Zea- genus grasses (monocots) were introduced to seeds of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), a dicot. Germination-reducing microbes were subsequently applied to plant species more closely related to the native hosts of the microbes to identify possible patterns between phylogeny and endophyte compatibility. Plant host phylogeny was not found to be an accurate predictor of this interaction. In parallel, as microbes exist within communities in nature, cohort strains from original Zea sources were co-inoculated with the biocontrol agents to test the hypothesis that they would increase their efficacy in non-sterile media. The co-inoculant strategy was not successful but identified one compatible cohort.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9618
Date: 2016-05
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada