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Predictors of antisocial behaviour in offenders: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

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Title: Predictors of antisocial behaviour in offenders: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour
Author: MacTavish, Angele
Department: Department of Psychology
Program: Psychology
Advisor: Hennig, Karl
Abstract: This study contributes to the understanding of antisocial behaviour following release from custody (i.e., recidivism) by clarifying the role specific determinants play in the prediction of antisocial behaviour. The current study examined both the empirically based forensic model and the conceptually based Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) model in the prediction of antisocial behaviour. This study also evaluated the effectiveness of the Criminal Attitudes Program (CAP program), a treatment program designed to decrease antisocial attitudes and subsequent antisocial behaviour in correctional offenders. Correctional offenders (N = 930) completed self-report measures of antisocial and prosocial tendencies upon commencement and upon completion of the CAP program. Antisocial behaviour was measured using rearrest data. A psychometrically sound set of measures was developed to evaluate the TPB model and CAP program, based on original questionnaires. CAP program completion was associated with significant and positive changes from pre- to post-treatment. However, there was no correlation between CAP program completion and antisocial behaviour upon release. Path modeling indicated the TPB model predicted CAP program completion and antisocial behaviour severity upon release. Findings highlight the importance of using the theoretically driven TPB model to examine direct and indirect predictors of antisocial behaviour, in addition to the forensic-empirical model. Important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9596
Date: 2015-11
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada