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Alternative Education Programs: An In-Depth Analysis of an Individualized Learning Experience

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dc.contributor.advisor O'Grady, Bill
dc.contributor.author Lafferty, Robin
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-27T19:20:43Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-27T19:20:43Z
dc.date.copyright 2015-10
dc.date.created 2015-10-21
dc.date.issued 2015-10-27
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/9321
dc.description.abstract Alternative education programs are becoming increasingly available in North America, yet they are understudied. In-depth research that addresses the structure of alternative education programs was undertaken to understand if these programs are useful and, if they are, why they are beneficial to students. This research addresses current gaps in the sociology of education literature with respect to understanding the school culture and school climate of alternative high schools within a school board in Southern Ontario. Findings show that student success is primarily defined and measured individually since alternative students are deemed at-risk youth who have a wide range of academic and non-academic needs. Symbolic interactionism, as well as a class-based analysis, to some extent, is useful to explain how student success is defined and measured among alternative students. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title Alternative Education Programs: An In-Depth Analysis of an Individualized Learning Experience en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Sociology en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Arts en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Sociology and Anthropology en_US
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