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Time-Based Work-Personal Life Conflict and Burnout: Predictors of Enacted Workplace Incivility

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Title: Time-Based Work-Personal Life Conflict and Burnout: Predictors of Enacted Workplace Incivility
Author: Chris, Alexandra
Department: Department of Psychology
Program: Psychology
Advisor: González-Morales, M. Gloria
Abstract: The existing incivility literature has focused primarily on the antecedents of incivility using between person analyses. This study builds on the previous literature by examining the antecedents of incivility using a within-persons diary study. Using a sample of 101 participants, the current study examined the daily relationships between time-based work-personal life conflict and enacted incivility towards coworkers and patients, as well as the moderating role of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Participants completed surveys twice daily over five consecutive working days. The data was analyzed with a hierarchical linear modeling approach using the nlme and multilevel packages in R software, version 3.0.0. There were 16 hypotheses and only two were supported. The significant results indicated that time-based personal-to-work life conflict predicted enacted incivility towards coworkers and that emotional exhaustion predicted enacted incivility towards patients. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/8522
Date: 2014-10
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