Main content

Terrestrial Deposition of Embryos as a Strategy to Reduce Predation and Enhance Development in the Mangrove Rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus

Show full item record

Title: Terrestrial Deposition of Embryos as a Strategy to Reduce Predation and Enhance Development in the Mangrove Rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus
Author: Wells, Michael
Department: Department of Integrative Biology
Program: Integrative Biology
Advisor: Wright, Patricia
Abstract: Strategies used by amphibious fishes to survive air-exposure have been studied, but how biotic and abiotic factors affect terrestrial development has received little attention. I hypothesized that rivulus deposit embryos in terrestrial environments to avoid cannibalism and to access higher oxygen levels. Adults recognized kinship of single embryos, cannibalizing unrelated embryos, but not their own. In air, cannibalism was not observed. Rivulus released ~2-fold more embryos in air than water. Air-reared embryos had accelerated development, greater yolk reserves, lower oxygen uptake, but similar morphology relative to water-reared embryos. These results suggest that exposure to an oxygen-rich aerial environment is energetically less costly than development in water. Overall, I conclude that kin recognition and terrestrial development increased embryonic survival; furthermore terrestrial incubation accelerated development possibly through higher oxygen supplies. This research sheds light on the biotic and abiotic factors that influenced early development of ancestral vertebrates out of water.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/7845
Date: 2014-01
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 Canada


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
Wells_Michael_201401_Msc.pdf 852.0Kb PDF View/Open Updated Thesis as of 11:30pm, Jan 30th

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 Canada