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The role of specific estrogen receptors in mediating rapid estrogenic improvements of social learning in female mice

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dc.contributor.advisor Choleris, Elena
dc.contributor.author Ervin, Kelsy
dc.date.accessioned 2014-01-14T20:55:12Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-14T20:55:12Z
dc.date.copyright 2013-12
dc.date.created 2013-12-12
dc.date.issued 2014-01-14
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/7818
dc.description.abstract Social learning is a process by which an animal gains information from another; however much of the research on estrogens effects on learning focuses on individual learning tasks. We therefore examined the effects of 17-estradiol (17beta-E2) and agonists for the estrogen receptors (ERs) ER-alpha, ER-beta, and the G protein-coupled ER 1 (GPER1) on the social transmission of food preferences (STFP) task, within a time scale allowing us to determine the rapid effects of estrogens. General ER activation with 17beta-E2 rapidly improved social learning on this task. Specific activation of the GPER1 also rapidly improved social learning, suggesting that 17beta-E2 acts through the GPER1 to rapidly improve learning on the STFP. Activation of ER-alpha and ER-beta activation, however, induced some impairing effects on learning. Rapid estrogenic modulation of social learning in the STFP therefore likely depends on the receptors activated, as each ER differently affected learning on this task. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Attribution 2.5 Canada *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ca/ *
dc.subject estradiol en_US
dc.subject social transmission of food preference en_US
dc.subject estrogen receptor alpha en_US
dc.subject estrogen receptor beta en_US
dc.subject G protein-coupled estrogen receptor en_US
dc.subject GPER en_US
dc.subject GPR30 en_US
dc.title The role of specific estrogen receptors in mediating rapid estrogenic improvements of social learning in female mice en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Psychology en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Psychology en_US
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