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Does Non-Emergency Food Aid have an Adverse Affect on Food Production and Producer Prices in sub-Saharan Africa?

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Title: Does Non-Emergency Food Aid have an Adverse Affect on Food Production and Producer Prices in sub-Saharan Africa?
Author: Wilkes, Johanna
Department: Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics
Program: Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics
Advisor: Sarker, Rakhal
Abstract: This thesis investigates the affect of non-emergency food aid on producer prices and production quantities for cereal grains within the recipient country’s economy. The decision to evaluate developmental or non-emergency food aid (NEFA) stems from a lack of research on a macro scale of disaggregated food aid categories and their implications on developing country producers. The Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region is the world’s largest recipient of direct transfer non-emergency food aid leaving the region most susceptible to the ambiguous affects of these food aid allocations. The results for this research suggests that not only are there no detectable disincentive effects but that there is little explanatory power from non-emergency food aid based on the 12 sample countries within the region. Additionally, an estimation of NEFA’s relationship with imports suggests that rather then an addition to total supply, the international trade composition is flexible.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/7435
Date: 2013-08
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