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THE INCIDENCE, SIGNIFICANCE AND DIAGNOSIS OF CLINICAL AND NON-CLINICAL BOVINE DEMODICIDOSIS

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Title: THE INCIDENCE, SIGNIFICANCE AND DIAGNOSIS OF CLINICAL AND NON-CLINICAL BOVINE DEMODICIDOSIS
Author: Smith, H.J.
Abstract: Demodicidosis is the term used to describe infestation with demodectic mites. The species of mites found in cattle is Demodex bovis Stiles, 1892. This and all other species of demodectic mites belong to the single Genua Demodex in the Family Demodicidae (6). In recent years, tanners have recognized defects in finished leather to which the descriptive term "pinhole" damage has been applied. The aetiology of this damage has been attributed to the early stages of bovine demodicidosis (39 and 49). In the United States, this damage is considered one of the most serious economic losses in the leather industry (38, 39 and 51). In Canada, the incidence of pinhole damage is also of great concern to the leather industry causing downgrading of the leather, with a substantial depreciation in its value (20). An incidence of 10 per cent is common in some lets of hides. In spite of the high incidence in hides, demodicidosis has not been recognized as a common clinical condition in this country. Hearle, in 1938, (22) described the disease as the rarest form of mange and one which is not very often encountered. Records of the diagnostic laboratory of the Department ef Parasitology at the Ontario Veterinary College revealed only two cases of demodicidosis in cattle from I955 to 1959 (10). Such brief reports constituted our knowledge of the disease in Canada and for this reason studies were undertaken at the request of the Canadian Tanner's Association. The initial investigations have been directed to gathering data on the incidence of the disease, its significance in cattle and to the leather industry, and to establishing methods of diagnosis As the studies dealt with the afore mentioned aspects of the disease, the data and observations are presented in three parts: l) incidence 2) significance and 3) diagnosis.
Description: A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Toronto in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Veterinary Science 1960
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/4893
Date: 1960
Rights: This work may be protected by copyright laws and is provided for educational and research purposes only. If you believe you are the rights holder and object to the University of Guelph's use of this document, please contact libair@uoguelph.ca.


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