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Designing for Food, Community and Multi-Use Space: Lessons Learned from Grassroots Urban Agriculture

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Title: Designing for Food, Community and Multi-Use Space: Lessons Learned from Grassroots Urban Agriculture
Author: Hurst, Katie
Department: School of Environmental Design and Rural Development
Program: Landscape Architecture
Advisor: Landman, Karen
Abstract: Grassroots urban agriculture projects are highly interactive spaces, allowing people from different socio-cultural and economic backgrounds to learn, play and work together. They offer unconventional urban greenspace and recreational opportunities and contribute to urbanites’ understanding of how food is grown. Landscape architects can contribute numerous professional strengths to the design of these food-oriented landscapes. Case study research at Hackney City Farm, UK, and Prinzessinnengarten, Germany, illustrates that grassroots projects could benefit from a strong spatial design and increased layering of on-site uses in order to serve a greater cross-section of the community than at present. This research culminates in the design of a multifunctional food-oriented landscape at Brant Avenue Public School, Guelph, and is shaped by the case study findings and literature on participatory design and facilitation. The research demonstrates how landscape architects can work with community groups to provide a high diversity of on-site uses and user experience.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3564
Date: 2012-04
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