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Transcript and Metabolite Signature of the Late-Flowering Maize Mutant indeterminate1: Implications for the Floral Transition in Day-Neutral Species

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dc.contributor.advisor Colasanti, Joseph
dc.contributor.author Coneva, Viktoriya
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-02T14:18:51Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-02T14:18:51Z
dc.date.copyright 2012-04
dc.date.created 2012-04-23
dc.date.issued 2012-05-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3543
dc.description.abstract Temperate maize is one of few model species that relies mainly on endogenous indicators of the plant’s developmental stage to cue the onset of reproductive development. The INDETERMINATE1 (ID1) transcription factor is a key regulator of the floral transition and id1 mutants are very late-flowering. ID1 is expressed and remains localized in developing leaves, while florigenic signals originate in mature, photosynthetically active leaves. Since very little is known about the molecular components of the floral transition in maize, and in autonomously flowering species at large, this work utilized id1 mutants to analyze the transcriptional and physiological alterations associated with the floral transition in maize. Analyses of functional categories of transcriptional change between developing leaves of id1 non-flowering mutants and normal flowering maize suggest a role for ID1 in energy metabolism and epigenetic regulation of leaf development. In addition, a novel family of -glucosidase genes were found to be expressed exclusively in immature leaves of normal flowering maize in a pattern similar to the ID1 gene suggesting that these genes may act in concert downstream of ID1. Further, profiling of transcript and metabolite alterations in mature leaves, which are likely the source of floral cues, suggest that coordination of resource storage in the form of transitory starch is an important signal for floral promotion in maize. Finally, analysis of the floral transition in Balsas teosinte, the progenitor of modern maize and an obligate short-day plant, suggests that ID1 may define a regulatory module unique to the autonomous floral regulation pathway in maize and related grass species. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject maize en_US
dc.subject flowering time en_US
dc.subject transcript and metabolite signature en_US
dc.subject transcription factor en_US
dc.subject teosinte en_US
dc.title Transcript and Metabolite Signature of the Late-Flowering Maize Mutant indeterminate1: Implications for the Floral Transition in Day-Neutral Species en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Molecular and Cellular Biology en_US
dc.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology en_US
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