Main content

NUTRITIONAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF FEEDING DISTILLER’S GRAINS PLUS SOLUBLE TO FEEDLOT CATTLE

Show full item record

Title: NUTRITIONAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF FEEDING DISTILLER’S GRAINS PLUS SOLUBLE TO FEEDLOT CATTLE
Author: Salim, Heba
Department: Department of Animal and Poultry Science
Program: Animal and Poultry Science
Advisor: Cant, John
Abstract: In this study, four experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of inclusion level of dry distillers grains plus solubles (DDGS) or modified wet distillers grains plus solubles (MWDGS) (0, 16.7, 33.3, and 50% of ration DM) on performance, carcass characteristics, feeding behaviour, nutrient balance, nutrient excretion, and enzymatic activity using whole corn grain-based finishing diets. In experiment one, there were no effects (P > 0.05) of dietary treatment on final BW, ADG, days on feed, rumen pH at slaughter, dressing %, hot carcass weight, marbling score, lean yield, and lean color. Liver abscess score was lower in steers fed DGS than steers fed the control. Visits of cattle to the feeder (VF) increased when cattle were fed up to 16.7% of DDGS or 33.3% of MWDSG. Number of meals (NM) and eating rate (ER) was greater and time per meal (TM) was lower in cattle fed MWDGS compared to those fed DDGS. Also, increasing the distillers grains plus soluble (DGS) increased daily time at feeder (TF); however, ER decreased when cattle were fed up to33.3% of DGS and after that increased. In experiment two, total tract DM, OM, and starch digestibility decreased with increasing DDGS up to 50%. Daily intake and total excretion of N, P, S, Mg, and K increased linearly with increasing level of DDGS. Nitrogen retention did not change with level of DDGS; however, P retention tended to increase and S retention increased with increasing DDGS. The digestion and retention of Se, Mg, K, and Na did not differ among the treatments. In experiment three, although the pancreatic protein concentration (mg/g) increased linearly with increasing DGS levels, pancreatic mass (g and g/kg BW) did not change. Feeding DGS increased the pancreatic concentration of α-amylase and trypsin activity (U/g) compared to the control diet. Increasing the DGS level increased pancreatic concentration of trypsin activity (U/g). In experiment four, increasing DGS linearly increased kidney weight (g). Hepatic and renal glutathione peroxidases (GPX) activity was not influenced by inclusion level or form of DGS. However, renal GPX activity per kilogram of BW was affected by the form and linear effect interaction. Increasing inclusion level of DGS linearly increased carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) activity (kU/liver, and U/kg of BW), argininosuccinate synthetase (AS) and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) activity (U/g, kU/liver, and U/kg of BW).The results of these studies suggest that feeding DDGS or MWDGS up to 50% diet DM in whole corn grain-based finishing diets does not negatively affect animal performance, although animals appear to adapt by altering feeding behaviour and nutrient metabolism. However, environmental implications of manure should be considered in the feedlot.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3022
Date: 2011-09


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
Salim_H thesis 2011.pdf 681.3Kb PDF View/Open Heba Salim PhD thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record