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Investigating Factors Associated with Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Colonization and/or Infection in Humans: A One Health Approach

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Title: Investigating Factors Associated with Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Colonization and/or Infection in Humans: A One Health Approach
Author: Goltz, Jamie
Department: Department of Population Medicine
Program: Population Medicine
Advisor: Parmley, JaneCarson, Carolee
Abstract: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) represents a complex health challenge at the intersection of humans, animals, and environments. This thesis used a One Health approach to expand the current understanding of which factors influence AMR in Canadians. The objectives were to 1) identify potential factors associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization and/or infection in humans, and 2) create a tool that can incorporate data about these factors to evaluate various exposure pathways in humans. Many factors associated with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonization and/or infection were identified and a model framework to estimate the influence of different population characteristics and activities on the probability of being colonized or infected with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was developed. This model serves as a novel tool for studying AMR and providing evidence-based information to better address AMR interventions. Further, the remaining modelling challenges that still need to be addressed to better capture the complexity of AMR are highlighted.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10214/26906
Date: 2022
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