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Thyroid Hormones Induce Programmed Cell Death in Sea Urchin (Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus) Larval Arms Prior to Metamorphosis.

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Title: Thyroid Hormones Induce Programmed Cell Death in Sea Urchin (Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus) Larval Arms Prior to Metamorphosis.
Author: Wynen, Hannah
Department: Department of Integrative Biology
Program: Integrative Biology
Advisor: Heyland, Andreas
Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) are important for development, metabolism and homeostasis in metazoans. They also regulate metamorphosis in many species with indirect life histories. There is evidence that in indirectly developing sea urchins, THs accelerate larval arm retraction prior to metamorphic development and it has been speculated that this is mediated by programmed cell death (PCD). In my thesis I investigated the role of THs on PCD in larval stages of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and tested the hypothesis that TH-regulated PCD is a mechanism in larval arm retraction. I showed that treatment with T3, T4 or Tetrac resulted in increased apoptosis in the postoral arms of postingression larvae but not preingression larvae. As postingression larvae have initiated metamorphic development, these results provide evidence that THs regulate apoptosis in the postoral larval arms during metamorphic development, prior to settlement. In conclusion, my results also suggest that hormonal regulation of PCD is associated with metamorphic development in sea urchins.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10214/26514
Date: 2021-10
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Related Publications: Wynen, H., Heyland, A. 2021. Hormonal regulation of programmed cell death in sea urchin metamorphosis. Front. Ecol. Environ., 9. DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2021.733787


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International