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Using the narrative self to reconcile the individual and the community in the Canadian state

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Title: Using the narrative self to reconcile the individual and the community in the Canadian state
Author: Scala, James John Howard
Department: Department of Philosophy
Advisor: Hughes, W.
Abstract: This thesis is an investigation of the communitarian-liberal debate in contemporary political philosophy. At the core of this project is the discussion of three pivotal issues: the nature of individual agency, the good life, and the relation between the individual, the good life, and the state. I begin by examining some of the contemporary theories concerning the nature of individual agency. Drawing from the writings of Alasdair MacIntyre and Charles Taylor I opt for a theory of the individual known as the narrative concept of the self. The narrative concept of the self attempts to account for how an individual experiences the various stages in life and how moral decisions are made. By exploring some of Charles Taylor's concepts, namely active respect, attitudinal respect, dignity, and the affirmation of ordinary life, I piece together a model of the good life which I believe reflects the way things are today. I conclude that, due to the intimate and inextricable connection between individuals and their communities, a degree of civic virtue is natural and necessary for the healthy existence of the Canadian-system.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10214/25012
Date: 1998
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