Main content

Petroleum Fate and Transport Modelling and Its Implications for Landscape-Responsive Design

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Corry, Robert
dc.contributor.author Ganesan, Sita
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-13T14:11:36Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-13T14:11:36Z
dc.date.copyright 2020-05
dc.date.created 2020-04-28
dc.date.issued 2020-05-13
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17938
dc.description.abstract Despite investments in clean energy technology and infrastructure, Canada remains a resource-based economy that transports fossil fuels. Most transport is conducted by pipeline, which can cause severe environmental damages because leak detection system sensitivity is low and 15-20% of pipeline leaks go undetected each year. Low impact development (LID) strategies might be applicable to pipeline landscapes to mitigate petroleum leaching to water from small, persistent leaks by incorporating petroleum sorbents with native soils. Petroleum fate and transport models were used to explore the theoretical capacity of a designed sorbent filter soil (SFS) system and to inform design parameters for system construction. Results suggest that design parameters change depending on soil texture, moisture content, and temperature. These designs provide a preliminary framework for landscape architects interested in landscape damage prevention and mitigation that could be applied to areas of concern for petroleum leakage. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship University of Guelph, Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology, the estate of Arthur D. Latornell, John E. (Jack) Irving Scholarship, Robb Graduate Research Travel Grant, and Soden Memorial Graduate Scholarship en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Terrestrial oil spill en_US
dc.subject pipeline en_US
dc.subject BTEX en_US
dc.subject low impact development en_US
dc.subject LID en_US
dc.subject filter soil en_US
dc.subject sorbent en_US
dc.subject oil transport modelling en_US
dc.subject VLEACH en_US
dc.title Petroleum Fate and Transport Modelling and Its Implications for Landscape-Responsive Design en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.degree.department School of Environmental Design and Rural Development en_US
dc.rights.license All items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Ganesan_Sita_202005_MLA.pdf 2.411Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record