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Investigation of the effect of vibration on the thermal field of real and simulated lithium-ion batteries

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Title: Investigation of the effect of vibration on the thermal field of real and simulated lithium-ion batteries
Author: Shukla, Karan
Department: School of Engineering
Program: Engineering
Advisor: Tasnim, Syeda
Abstract: Electric and hybrid electric vehicles are gaining popularity because of depleting conventional sources of energy and climate change. However, the design of electric vehicles requires the fundamental understanding of vibration's effect on the thermal behavior of the battery. This thesis presents an experimental analysis on the effect of vibration on the thermal behavior of real and simulated Lithium ion batteries at three discharge rates (i.e., 1 C, 2 C, and 3 C), three different vibration frequencies (i.e., 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and 30 Hz), and three different amplitudes of vibrations (i.e., 40 mm/s, 55 mm/s, and 70 mm/s). Battery surface temperatures are measured using thermocouples and infrared camera. Top region of the battery heats up faster, but a uniform temperature distribution is observed later as the experiment continues. The surface temperature of the battery increases with the discharge rate. The effect of vibration on temperature rise is pronounced in real batteries with a maximum difference of 5 ℃. The variation of average Nusselt number with time is calculated. The findings of this study will assist in the development of efficient battery thermal management designs for electric vehicles.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17915
Date: 2020-04-20
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Terms of Use: All items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.


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Shukla_Karan_202004_MASc.pdfuntranslated 2.798Mb PDF View/Open 1C 55 mm/s: In Fig. 2.18 surface temperature of the Simulated Lithium-ion battery is plotted as a function of time for three different values of frequencies of vibration (i.e., 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and 30 Hz). The applied vibration amplitude was kept at 55 mm/s for this case, while the discharge rate was 1C. For the comparison purpose, the transient temperature distribution without vibration is added to the plot as well. Temperature profiles show three distinct patterns as time advances. In the first zone (approximately until the 1210s for this case), the rate of temperature increase with time is highest among the three zones. Immediately after this first zone, the slope of the temperature-time profiles decreases approximately until 2725s. Beyond this zone, the slope of the temperature-time profiles decreases further and shows a trend of reaching limiting temperature values. However, the influence of vibration on the transient temperature distribution is not distinct in any zone at a given time, the magnitude of temperature remained unchanged for vibrations and no vibration case. Similar trend in the transient temperature distribution can be seen in cases that involves a change in the frequencies. For example, for a particular case (i.e., 1C and 55 mm/s) a very similar trend of the transient temperature distribution for each case is seen for instance, at 1600s temperature for vibration cases were 42.0℃, 42.0℃ and 41.3℃ for 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and 30 Hz, respectively, while it was 41.4℃ for no vibration case. (Very small effect on the change of frequency at this amplitude and discharge). 1C 70 mm/s: In Fig. 2.19 surface temperature of the Simulated Lithium-ion battery is plotted as a function of time for three different values of frequencies of vibration (i.e., 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and 30 Hz). The applied vibration amplitude was kept at 70 mm/s for this case, while the discharge rate was 1C. For the comparison purpose, the transient temperature distribution without vibration is added to the plot as well. Temperature profiles show three distinct patterns as time advances. In the first zone (approximately until the 1170s for this case), the rate of temperature increase with time is highest among the three zones. Immediately after this first zone, the slope of the temperature-time profiles decreases approximately until the 2690s. Beyond this zone, the slope of the temperature-time profiles decreases further and shows a trend of reaching limiting temperature values. However, the influence of vibration on the transient temperature distribution is not distinct in any zone at a given time, the magnitude of temperature remained unchanged for vibrations and no vibration case. Similar trend in the transient temperature distribution can be seen in cases that involves a change in the frequencies. For example, for a particular case (i.e., 1C and 70 mm/s) a very similar trend of the transient temperature distribution for each case is seen for instance, at 1600s temperature for vibration cases were 42.1℃, 41.8℃ and 42.0℃ for 10 Hz, 20 Hz and 30 Hz, respectively, while it was 41.4℃ for no vibration case. (Very small effect on the change of frequency at this amplitude and discharge).

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International