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From Lab to Greenhouse: Shedding Light on the Role of Spectral Quality and CO2 Concentration in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Production

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dc.contributor.advisor Grodzinski, Bernard
dc.contributor.advisor Hao, Xiuming
dc.contributor.author Lanoue, Jason
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-04T16:54:19Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-04T16:54:19Z
dc.date.copyright 2020-04
dc.date.created 2020-04-17
dc.date.issued 2020-05-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17900
dc.description.abstract During the light limiting winter months in Canada and other northern countries, supplementary lighting is needed during greenhouse production to meet consumer demand for fresh vegetables. The advancements in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have made them a viable source for supplementary lighting, with many advantages over traditionally high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaries. Due to their low heat emittance, compact design, and ability to supply wavelength specific light, LEDs provide an unparalleled flexibility in the development and implementation of lighting strategies for crop production. This thesis is an investigation of spectral quality and CO2 concentration and how these factors can affect tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) growth specifically tailored towards the implementation of LED lighting fixtures in commercial production. Fundamental pathways such as CO2 and H2O gas exchange at both the leaf and whole plant level as well as the process of carbon export were examined under a variety of spectral qualities and CO2 concentrations. Results from experiments involving whole plant gas exchange and carbon export were then used during a production style greenhouse experiment where the effects of continuous lighting on tomato physiology and yield were assessed. Results from this thesis aim to not only increase our understanding of how fundamental pathways respond to abiotic stress, but also how utilizing laboratory data can aid in the design and implementation of greenhouse lighting strategies to increase yield and sustainability of tomato production during light limiting periods. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Agriculture & Agri-food Canada en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/ *
dc.subject Tomato en_US
dc.subject Greenhouse en_US
dc.subject Photosynthesis en_US
dc.subject Carbon Export en_US
dc.subject Light Quality en_US
dc.subject Water Movement en_US
dc.subject Continuous Lighting en_US
dc.title From Lab to Greenhouse: Shedding Light on the Role of Spectral Quality and CO2 Concentration in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Production en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Plant Agriculture en_US
dc.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Plant Agriculture en_US
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Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International