Main content

Construction of a Host Cell Genetic Adhesion Network in Staphylococcus aureus Identifies a Novel Role for Autolysin

Show full item record

Title: Construction of a Host Cell Genetic Adhesion Network in Staphylococcus aureus Identifies a Novel Role for Autolysin
Author: Petrie, Laurenne
Department: Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Program: Molecular and Cellular Biology
Advisor: Cox, Georgina
Abstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of nosocomial infections. Integral to its virulence are cell wall-anchored adhesive proteins that enable the bacteria to bind to a variety of host cell ligands, facilitating important infective processes. This thesis describes the delineation of the genetic determinants of S. aureus host cell adhesion under three clinically relevant contexts. Using a novel adhesion assay, 1952 MRSA transposon mutants were profiled to identify gene disruptions that compromise adhesion. The resulting genetic adhesion network provides insight into the complex regulatory cascades controlling the expression of adhesins in S. aureus and suggests a unique function for the S. aureus major autolysin (Atl) in the presentation of key adhesins. Inhibition of Atl catalytic function resulted in diminished S. aureus adherence to host cell polymers, possibly resulting from adhesins being sequestered at the septum during cell division, suggesting a new role for Atl in adhesion.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17736
Date: 2019-12
Terms of Use: All items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Petrie_Laurenne_202001_MSc.pdfuntranslated 4.539Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record