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High-frequency endurance training, but not low-frequency sprint interval training, improves glycemic regulation and cardiovascular risk-factors in obese males

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Title: High-frequency endurance training, but not low-frequency sprint interval training, improves glycemic regulation and cardiovascular risk-factors in obese males
Author: Petrick, Heather
Department: Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences
Program: Human Health and Nutritional Sciences
Advisor: Burr, JamieHolloway, Graham
Abstract: Involvement in daily moderate intensity continuous endurance (END) exercise is well known to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, however, the time-effective alternative of sprint interval training (SIT) has gained considerable popularity. It remains debatable if SIT is equally effective for decreasing cardiometabolic risk-factors, as many beneficial effects of exercise are transient, and unlike END, SIT cannot be performed daily. Therefore, this thesis examined the ability of chronic SIT or END to improve cardiometabolic health in obese males. This thesis established that over a 6 week period, 1) high-frequency END, but not low-frequency SIT, improved fitness, glucose tolerance, blood pressure, and body composition; 2) END and SIT appeared to elicit divergent outcomes with respect to arterial stiffness and cardiovascular health; and 3) daily exercise of END was an important factor mediating improvements in free-living glycemic regulation. Combined, these data suggest exercise frequency may be an underappreciated variable in improving health.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17410
Date: 2019-09
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