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White Women in the Medina: Race, Gender, and Orientalism in Women's Travel Writing on Morocco

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Title: White Women in the Medina: Race, Gender, and Orientalism in Women's Travel Writing on Morocco
Author: Wade-Lang, Faron
Department: School of English and Theatre Studies
Program: English
Advisor: Cairnie, Julie
Abstract: This thesis examines how Orientalism appears in the writing of three works of women’s travel writing on Morocco and how that mode of representation influences their writing about Moroccan women and women’s spaces. The first text is Edith Wharton’s In Morocco (1920), a text that consciously utilizes Orientalist discourse to justify French colonialism, even when the author appears to be expressing sympathy towards Moroccan women. The second is Elizabeth Fernea’s A Street in Marrakech (1976), a more ethnographic account of her befriending Moroccan women that captures the ambivalent belonging she experiences due to her position as a white woman. The third is Suzanna Clarke’s A House in Fez (2007), a text that demonstrates how obsession with authenticity and white feminine benevolence can be underwritten by colonialist assumptions. By examining these texts together, this thesis argues that Orientalism continues to be articulated in new ways, altering depending on the author’s subject position.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/17392
Date: 2019-09
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International