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Foot sole cutaneous stimulation mitigates neuromuscular fatigue during a sustained plantar flexor isometric task with intermittent maximal voluntary contractions

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dc.contributor.advisor Bent, Leah
dc.contributor.author Smith, Simone
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-28T18:42:58Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-28T18:42:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2019-06
dc.date.created 2019-06-20
dc.date.issued 2019-08-28
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/16960
dc.description.abstract Neuromuscular fatigue induces changes in motor coordination, movement stability, and proprioception, which further affects performance. Coupling exists between foot sole cutaneous mechanoreceptors and motoneurons of the lower limb, however, the contribution of skin sensory input on muscle fatigue remains unclear. This thesis aims to determine whether foot sole cutaneous stimulation alters fatigability and recovery of the plantar flexor muscles. Participants underwent an isometric plantar flexor fatiguing task with intermittent maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) in a seated posture until failure. Throughout the protocol, electrical stimulation was applied to either the right heel, right metatarsal, left arm, or no stimulation. MVCs were conducted intermittently throughout recovery. Foot sole cutaneous stimulation mitigated fatigue with stimulation on either the heel or metatarsal regions. Recovery was not altered by stimulation. The results suggest that cutaneous stimulation may serve as a feasible target to mitigate fatigue. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ *
dc.subject cutaneous stimulation en_US
dc.subject plantar flexion en_US
dc.subject recovery en_US
dc.subject foot sole en_US
dc.subject neuromuscular fatigue en_US
dc.title Foot sole cutaneous stimulation mitigates neuromuscular fatigue during a sustained plantar flexor isometric task with intermittent maximal voluntary contractions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International