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Error Reporting: The Impact of Error Belief, Reporting Consequence, Error Consequence, Error Visibility, and Individual Difference Variables.

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Title: Error Reporting: The Impact of Error Belief, Reporting Consequence, Error Consequence, Error Visibility, and Individual Difference Variables.
Author: Pitel, Marian Carizze
Department: Department of Psychology
Program: Psychology
Advisor: Hausdorf, Peter A
Abstract: Work errors can have severe consequences on the error committer, other employees, the organization, and other stakeholders. Reporting work errors to management, informally or formally, is imperative as it can help prevent error cascades, mitigate legal ramifications, facilitate individual and social learning, and reduce future error commission. Because reporting work errors can have positive outcomes for the individual, their work unit, and the organization, it is important to investigate the antecedents of error reporting. By using a policy-capturing design and taking a socioecological approach, this study empirically tested how organizational (e.g. error belief, reporting consequence), situational (e.g. error consequence, error visibility) and individual difference (e.g. locus of control, conscientiousness, and honesty-humility) variables influence the likelihood of individual error reporting. Hypothesis testing using hierarchical linear modeling demonstrated that high error visibility, low error consequence, and higher honesty-humility were associated with greater likelihood of reporting. Key insights, theoretical contributions, and practical contributions are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/14123
Date: 2018-08
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