Main content

Development of an Electrochemical Immunosensing Platform for Detection of Avian Influenza Viruses Using a Hybrid Nanocomposite Scaffold

Show full item record

Title: Development of an Electrochemical Immunosensing Platform for Detection of Avian Influenza Viruses Using a Hybrid Nanocomposite Scaffold
Author: Buozis, John
Department: School of Engineering
Program: Engineering
Advisor: Misra, ManjusriHayward, GordonGordon, Karen
Abstract: This thesis is an investigation of a sandwich-based electrochemical immunosensor for detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) strains H5N1, H4N6, and H9N2. This sensor was developed using gold-graphene nanocomposites, immobilized viral antibodies, and cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dot electrochemical tagging. The nanocomposites were formed by the simultaneous reduction of a gold salt and graphene using hydroquinone as the reducing agent, thus producing non-spherical gold nanoparticles on graphene sheets. Viral antibodies were immobilized on nanocomposites and CdTe quantum dots through N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. Cyclic voltammetry studies were used to validate the detection of H5 surface protein and H4N6 inactivated virus. The immunosensor detected H5 protein in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fg/mL and a linear detection range was established for 10 ng/mL to 10 pg/mL. The biosensor detected H4N6 and H9N2 viruses in three parts diluted whole chicken blood with a LOD of 1.28x10-7 hemagglutinating units (HAU). Commercial ELISA testing for H4N6 showed a limit of detection of 0.128 HAU. The sensor showed 106-fold increased detection of H4N6 virus in blood in comparison to its commercial ELISA kit counterpart. The developed immunosensor may effectively change the way avian influenza is detected, monitored, and controlled; transforming time-consuming reactive methods, into rapid predictive technology.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/14107
Date: 2018-05
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
Terms of Use: All items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
Buozis_John_201808_MASc.pdf 2.386Mb PDF View/Open Thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada