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Phosphoethanolamine improves non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and enhances muscle insulin signaling, in Pcyt2 heterozygous mice.

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dc.contributor.advisor Bakovic, Marica
dc.contributor.author Mattos, Gabriela
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-23T16:44:23Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-23T16:44:23Z
dc.date.copyright 2018-08
dc.date.created 2018-08-09
dc.date.issued 2018-08-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/14093
dc.description.abstract Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is primarily synthesized by the Kennedy pathway, where a series of enzymatic reactions incorporate ethanolamine and diacylglycerol (DAG). This pathway is dependent on CTP-ethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (ET/Pcyt2), which is the rate limiting enzyme. Pcyt2 heterozygous mice (Pcyt2(+/-)) accumulate DAG and triacylglycerol due to the lack of utilization in the Kennedy pathway, leading to the development of obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and steatohepatitis. Here, we demonstrate that supplementation with phosphoethanolamine (PEA), the substrate of Pcyt2, has the ability to improve steatohepatitis caused by the lack of DAG utilization. PEA also enhanced insulin signaling to promote protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Genes involved in phospholipid biosynthesis and lipid metabolism were also stimulated by PEA to maintain phospholipid content and promote lipolysis. The effects of PCYT2 knockdown on human fibroblast cells were examined to provide insight as to how reductions in PCYT2 could result in lipid-related disorders in a human model. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Canadian Institutes of Health Research en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Pcyt2 en_US
dc.subject phospholipids en_US
dc.subject phosphoethanolamine en_US
dc.subject Kennedy pathway en_US
dc.subject ethanolamine en_US
dc.subject metabolic syndrome en_US
dc.subject steatohepatitis en_US
dc.title Phosphoethanolamine improves non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and enhances muscle insulin signaling, in Pcyt2 heterozygous mice. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US


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