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Intensity and Spatial Variation of Food Insecurity in Ontario: Implications for Policy

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Title: Intensity and Spatial Variation of Food Insecurity in Ontario: Implications for Policy
Author: Scholz, Alexander
Department: Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics
Program: Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics
Advisor: Deaton, Brady James, Dr.
Abstract: A growing body of research recognizes that the experience of food insecurity differs among food insecure households. Using responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey 2014, this thesis provides empirical evidence of the extent to which key economic and spatial factors differ at different levels of food insecurity in Ontario. The results indicate that low household income is the most important characteristic associated with a higher probability of being more severely food insecure. This finding is highly statistically significant and robust to alternative model specifications. I also find some evidence that spatial remoteness might increase the risk of household food insecurity. These findings are particularly important in light of current policy efforts in Canada, in which the topic of food insecurity features prominently.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/12946
Date: 2018-04
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