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Body Composition: How it is Assessed and its Relationship to Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease in the Dog

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dc.contributor.advisor Verbrugghe, Adronie
dc.contributor.author Santarossa, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-05T16:55:04Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-22T05:00:29Z
dc.date.copyright 2017-08
dc.date.created 2017-08-22
dc.date.issued 2017-09-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/11505
dc.description.abstract In veterinary medicine, it is well documented that there can be negative consequences associated with having an abnormal body composition, either underweight, overweight, or obese. Thus, it is important to assess the body composition of animals as an indicator of health. This thesis is an investigation of how body composition is assessed in companion animals by the veterinary team, and how body composition may be related to cranial cruciate ligament disease in the dog. Veterinary teams most commonly use body weight and body condition scoring methods to assess body composition, however, veterinary teams do not always assess body composition in their patients, although this is recommended by current nutritional assessment guidelines. Dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease were found to be more overweight or obese compared to a control group, but the association between obesity and the development of this disease is still unclear. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Hill's Pet Nutrition Inc. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/ *
dc.subject body composition en_US
dc.subject dog en_US
dc.subject cat en_US
dc.subject veterinary medicine en_US
dc.title Body Composition: How it is Assessed and its Relationship to Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease in the Dog en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Clinical Studies en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Clinical Studies en_US
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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada