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The Immobilization of Copper in Peatlands: Characterizing the Interactions Between Copper and Natural Organic Matter

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dc.contributor.advisor Glasauer/Smith, Susan/Scott
dc.contributor.author Boag, Matt
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-15T17:35:40Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-15T17:35:40Z
dc.date.copyright 2017-06
dc.date.created 2017-05-10
dc.date.issued 2017-06-15
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/10858
dc.description.abstract Organic soils cover large areas of Canada’s north and are vital to biogeochemical cycling. Near northern mining operations, organic soils of peatlands sequester potentially toxic metals. There is evidence that remobilization of metals takes place during cycles of freezing and thawing, which can be expected to cause seasonally elevated concentrations of metals in water discharging from peatland environments. This thesis investigates the potential seasonal export of metals from peat during freeze-thaw cycling. By characterizing different size fractions of natural organic matter and the respective complexes they form with copper, it was determined that freezing and thawing produces trends of increasing binding capacity and decreasing binding affinity in natural organic matter. Copper binding properties were also compared using two techniques commonly used to study organic matter; those being ultrafiltration and chemical extraction. It was determined that organic matter ≤ 5 kDa does not exhibit equal characteristics to chemically extracted fulvic acid. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NSERC en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject NOM en_US
dc.subject Cu en_US
dc.subject wetland en_US
dc.subject ultrafiltration en_US
dc.subject ISE en_US
dc.title The Immobilization of Copper in Peatlands: Characterizing the Interactions Between Copper and Natural Organic Matter en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Chemistry en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Chemistry en_US


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