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Characterization of the Independent and Combined Vasoactive Abilities of Hydrogen Ion and Carbon Dioxide in Skeletal Muscle Microvasculature

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dc.contributor.advisor Murrant, Coral
dc.contributor.author Charter, Mackenzie
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-29T19:17:30Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-29T19:17:30Z
dc.date.copyright 2017-05
dc.date.created 2017-05-24
dc.date.issued 2017-05-29
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/10498
dc.description.abstract Hydrogen ion (H+) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are products of skeletal muscle metabolism and have been implicated in the hyperaemic response to muscle contraction. The microvasculature is instrumental to the increase in blood flow during contraction and its distribution to active fibers. To investigate the vasodilatory ability of H+ and CO2 separately on the skeletal muscle microvasculature, Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) buffer was substituted for bicarbonate buffer and increasing concentrations/pressures of H+, CO2 and H+ with CO2 were applied to the cremaster muscle. 100.0 nmol/L H+, 60.7 mmHg CO2, and 60.7 mmHg CO2 with 158.5 nmol/L H+ induced 9.5 ± 1.9, 10.4 ± 3.1 and 7.6 ± 2.5 µm vasodilations respectively. Micropipette application of H+ and CO2 independently and combined onto arterioles and capillaries did not induce upstream arteriolar vasodilation. Thus, H+ and CO2 independently and combined are weak vasodilators that do not stimulate capillaries or arterioles to conduct vasodilation. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Hydrogen Ion en_US
dc.subject Carbon Dioxide en_US
dc.subject Microcirculation en_US
dc.subject Active Hyperaemia en_US
dc.subject Conducted Response en_US
dc.subject Vasodilator en_US
dc.title Characterization of the Independent and Combined Vasoactive Abilities of Hydrogen Ion and Carbon Dioxide in Skeletal Muscle Microvasculature en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
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