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Examining How Different Methodological Approaches Impact Safety Outcome Effects in Child Pedestrian Research: Comparing Typical and Novel Measurement Approaches in Virtual Reality

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Title: Examining How Different Methodological Approaches Impact Safety Outcome Effects in Child Pedestrian Research: Comparing Typical and Novel Measurement Approaches in Virtual Reality
Author: Corbett, Michael R.
Department: Department of Psychology
Program: Psychology
Advisor: Morrongiello, Barbara A.
Abstract: There has been a great deal of academic research aimed at understanding and preventing child pedestrian injury. Many varied methodologies have been employed with the goal of designing simulations that produce rigorous assessment of children’s behaviours without putting children at risk of pedestrian injury. Most research has assessed children’s pre-crossing decision making and extrapolated crossing outcome measures from estimates of mean walking speed. This study explores the nature and extent of measurement bias that is introduced when average walking speed is used to produce estimates of outcomes versus measuring actual in-road behaviour directly. Using a within-subjects design and a highly immersive virtual reality pedestrian simulator, both measures were taken. Comparisons based on regression models revealed the extent of differences in results produced by measurement bias. Results indicated that measurement bias is produced when average walking speed is used such that hits and high risk crossings are over-estimated and missed opportunities are under-estimated, resulting in an overall over-estimate of children’s risk for pedestrian injury. Results are discussed in relation to the importance of considering evasive action in child pedestrian research and critical perceptual-motor processes that have been under-emphasized in much of the child pedestrian literature.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/10285
Date: 2017-03


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