Parents' perceptions of their children's influence within the context of the parent-child relationship

dc.contributor.advisorKuczynski, L.
dc.contributor.authorTa, Loan K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-26T19:47:23Z
dc.date.available2021-04-26T19:47:23Z
dc.date.copyright1997
dc.degree.departmentDepartment of Family Studiesen_US
dc.degree.grantorUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored parents' perceptions of their children's influence within the context of the parent-child relationship in the personal, conventional, moral, and prudential domains. Sixty mothers and fathers in dual-parent families described real-life incidents of their children's influence. Parents perceived the most influence from their children in the conventional domain followed by personal, moral, and prudential domains. Parents reported their children to be moderately effective in influencing them to change their own immediate behaviour and longterm attitude in the four domains, and they were somewhat comfortable in accepting the change. Parents indicated their children were very active and assertive in influencing them. Children's influence strategies included assertion, negotiation/persuasion, and display of positive attributes. Mothers perceived more influence from their children than fathers. Parents referred to the close, interdependent, and longterm nature, past expectations, and future anticipations of the relationship to explain their children's influence.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10214/25389
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.rights.licenseAll items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectparents' perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectchildren's influenceen_US
dc.subjectparent-child relationshipen_US
dc.subjectpersonalen_US
dc.subjectconventionalen_US
dc.subjectmoralen_US
dc.subjectprudentialen_US
dc.titleParents' perceptions of their children's influence within the context of the parent-child relationshipen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

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