Difference within and without: Health care providers’ engagement with disability arts

dc.contributor.authorViscardis, Katharine
dc.contributor.authorRice, Carla
dc.contributor.authorPileggi, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorUnderhill, Angela
dc.contributor.authorChandler, Eliza
dc.contributor.authorChangfoot, Nadine
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Phyllis
dc.contributor.authorMykitiuk, Roxanne
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T17:10:25Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T17:10:25Z
dc.date.copyright2018-11-18
dc.date.created2019-09-19
dc.date.issued2018-11-18
dc.degree.departmentRe-Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice
dc.description.abstractRe•Vision, an assemblage of multimedia storytelling and arts-based research projects, works creatively and collaboratively with misrepresented communities to advance social well-being, inclusion, and justice. Drawing from videos created by health care providers in disability artist-led workshops, this article investigates the potential of disability arts to disrupt dominant conceptions of disability and invulnerable embodiments, and proliferate new representations of bodymind difference in health care. In exploring, remembering, and developing ideas related to their experiences with and assumptions about embodied difference, providers describe processes of unsettling the mythical norm of human embodiment common in health discourse/practice, coming to know disability in nonmedical ways, and re/discovering embodied differences and vulnerabilities. We argue that art-making produces instances of critical reflection wherein attitudes can shift, and new affective responses to difference can be made. Through self-reflective engagement with disability arts practices, providers come to recognize assumptions underlying health care practices and the vulnerability of their own embodied lives.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research was made possible with generous support from: The Gender and Health Institute of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR Grant # 106597); Canada Research Chair (# 950-231091); the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI #35254); and the Leaders Opportunity Fund (#217843). Principal Investigator Carla Rice.en_US
dc.identifier.citationViscardis, K., Rice, C., Pileggi, V., Underhill, A., Chandler, E., Changfoot, N., Montgomery, P., & Mykitiuk, R. (2018). Difference within and without: Health care providers' engagement with disability arts. Qualitative Health Research, Vol.29 (9), p.1287-1298. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732318808252
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1049732318808252
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10214/17477
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSage Journalsen_US
dc.rights.licenseAll items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectarts-based researchen_US
dc.subjecthealth careen_US
dc.subjectembodimenten_US
dc.subjectdisabilityen_US
dc.subjectvulnerabilityen_US
dc.subjectcritical reflexivityen_US
dc.subjectqualitativeen_US
dc.subjectmultimedia story-makingen_US
dc.subjectOntarioen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.titleDifference within and without: Health care providers’ engagement with disability artsen_US
dc.typeArticleen

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