Leatherback turtles: The menace of plastic

dc.contributor.affiliationSchool of Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.authorMrosovsky, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Geraldine D
dc.contributor.authorJames, Michael C
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-16T21:04:35Z
dc.date.available2009-09-16T21:04:35Z
dc.date.issued2009-02
dc.description.abstractThe leatherback, Dermochelys coriacea, is a large sea turtle that feeds primarily on jellyfish. Floating plastic garbage could be mistaken for such prey. Autopsy records of 408 leatherback turtles, spanning 123 years (1885–2007), were studied for the presence or absence of plastic in the GI tract. Plastic was reported in 34% of these cases. If only cases from our first report (1968) of plastic were considered, the figure was 37%. Blockage of the gut by plastic was mentioned in some accounts. These findings are discussed in the context of removal of top predators from poorly understood food chains.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-326X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10214/2014
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rights.licenseAll items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectLeatherbacken_US
dc.subjectDermochelys coriaceaen_US
dc.subjectSea turtleen_US
dc.subjectPlastic wasteen_US
dc.subjectFood intakeen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectJellyfishen_US
dc.titleLeatherback turtles: The menace of plasticen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dcterms.relationMrosovsky, N., Ryan, G.D., and James, M.C. "Leatherback turtles: The menace of plastic." Marine Pollution Bulletin 58.2 (2009): 287-289. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2008.10.018.

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