The role of illustrations in children's inferential comprehension

dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorPike, Meredith M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-07T16:43:55Z
dc.date.available2020-12-07T16:43:55Z
dc.date.copyright2008
dc.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.grantorUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
dc.description.abstractIllustrations are a salient source of information in children's books yet their effect on children's reading comprehension has only been studied through literal, factual recall. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of illustrations on some of the higher-order component skills of reading comprehension, namely making inferences. Identical short stories were presented under different illustration conditions, with pictures that represented different parts of the story. Participants were 73 children from grades two to six. Illustrations both facilitated and interfered with inferencing ability, depending on the type of information depicted, but this effect was reduced as grade increased. Additional findings were that the overall ability to make inferences increased with age and working memory was a significant predictor of this skill. Results are discussed in relation to cognitive and developmental models of comprehension.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10214/23143
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.rights.licenseAll items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectillustrationsen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectinferential comprehensionen_US
dc.subjectworking memoryen_US
dc.subjectinferencesen_US
dc.titleThe role of illustrations in children's inferential comprehensionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

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