Student Nutrition Programs: Meeting a Need for Hungry Children

dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorUnderhill, Angela
dc.contributor.authorMarrotte, Jayme
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-04T20:01:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-04T20:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-01
dc.degree.departmentCommunity Engaged Scholarship Institute (CESI)en
dc.descriptionPoster was part of 'What We Know' display, held on March 1, 2017 at the Quebec Street Mall in Downtown Guelph. At 'What We Know,' the Community Engaged Scholarship Institute brought together 50 posters featuring diverse research on Guelph and Wellington from community organizations, municipal staff, faculty and students. Topics included feral cats, farmland loss, food waste, the wellbeing of children and more - all specific to Guelph and Wellington.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccording to the Breakfast Club of Canada, 1 in 5 children arrive to school hungry due to a lack of access to nutritious food (2016). Research shows that children who are hungry during the day do not perform as well academically compared to their peers (White, Hill, Kemp, MacRae, & Young, 2012). Student nutrition programs (SNPs) provide nutritious food to students through breakfast, lunch, and snack programs to support healthy development and learning. Offered throughout Ontario, SNPs aim to provide food to students in a supportive and non-judgemental environment. In this study, we evaluated SNPs in four schools offered by Food & Friends in Wellington, Dufferin, and Guelph to understand the benefits and challenges of the program from the perspectives of students, principals, and program coordinators. 258 students in grades 6, 7, and 8 completed online surveys and 9 principals and program coordinators were interviewed. Our results show that the SNPs were viewed as beneficial to all students by providing healthy food, opportunities for student leadership, and a space for socializing. Concurrently, principals and program coordinators mentioned difficulties in running the programs which included funding cuts, space/storage for large amounts of food, and volunteer recruitment. Results from this study suggest that many of the benefits and challenges were common across the four schools.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10214/10383
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectGuelphen_US
dc.subjectGuelph Wellingtonen_US
dc.subjectWhat we knowen_US
dc.subjectThe Research Shopen_US
dc.subjectUpper Grand District School Boarden_US
dc.subjectstudent nutrition programen_US
dc.subjectWellingtonen_US
dc.subjecthealthy fooden_US
dc.titleStudent Nutrition Programs: Meeting a Need for Hungry Childrenen_US
dc.typeConference Posteren

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