How explicit prejudice, implicit prejudice, and gender interact to predict discriminatory behaviour against gay men

dc.contributor.advisorSon Hing, L.S.
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Leah K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-03T18:08:45Z
dc.date.available2020-12-03T18:08:45Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.degree.grantorUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
dc.description.abstractHow do people's self-reported (i.e., explicit) attitudes, automatically activated (i.e., implicit) attitudes, and gender interact to predict discriminatory behaviour against a gay man? In the context of a mock employment study, participants interacted with a confederate whose appearance and responses were designed to provide cues that he was gay. Results revealed that higher levels of implicit prejudice, but not explicit prejudice, predicted subtle discriminatory behaviour (i.e., speech hesitations) and deliberative evaluations of the confederate. In addition, explicit prejudice, implicit prejudice, and gender interacted to predict both subtle and blatant discriminatory behaviour against the confederate. Notably, among men who self-reported lower levels of prejudice against gay men, those with greater automatically activated prejudice were more likely to negatively evaluate the confederate. These intriguing results are discussed with respect to their theoretical implications for conceptualizing explicit and implicit prejudice and in terms of their practical implications concerning discrimination against gay men.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10214/21844
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Guelphen_US
dc.rights.licenseAll items in the Atrium are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectself-reported attitudesen_US
dc.subjectexplicit attitudesen_US
dc.subjectautomatically activated attitudesen_US
dc.subjectimplicit attitudesen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjectdiscriminatory behaviouren_US
dc.subjectgay menen_US
dc.titleHow explicit prejudice, implicit prejudice, and gender interact to predict discriminatory behaviour against gay menen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US

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