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Prior exercise training improves cold tolerance independent of indices associated with non-shivering thermogenesis

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dc.contributor.advisor Wright, David C
dc.contributor.author Knuth, Carly Michelle
dc.date.accessioned 2018-07-25T14:43:30Z
dc.date.available 2018-07-25T14:43:30Z
dc.date.copyright 2018-07
dc.date.created 2018-07-06
dc.date.issued 2018-07-25
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/14053
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether previous exercise training via voluntary wheel running (VWR) would improve cold tolerance by protecting against cold-induced reductions in rectal temperature. We hypothesized that this would be associated with an exercise-induced increase in white adipose tissue browning, which would contribute in an additive manner to cold-induced nonshivering thermogenesis. To examine this, male C57BL6 mice remained sedentary or were given free access to a wheel for 12 days. Mice were then kept at room temperature (25oC) or subjected to cold stress (4oC) for a period of 48 hours. The primary findings were two-fold; 1) prior exercise via VWR protects against cold-induced weight loss, through a mechanism involving increases in food intake and 2) prior exercise via VWR protects against cold-induced reductions in rectal temperature, however this is likely not associated with UCP-1-dependent nonshivering thermogenesis. Rather, the capacity for shivering thermogenesis may be enhanced. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.5/ca/ *
dc.subject exercise en_US
dc.subject cold en_US
dc.subject adipose en_US
dc.subject thermogenesis en_US
dc.subject UCP en_US
dc.subject mice en_US
dc.subject browning en_US
dc.subject glucose en_US
dc.title Prior exercise training improves cold tolerance independent of indices associated with non-shivering thermogenesis en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences en_US


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Attribution-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada