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Identifying Municipal Barriers Preventing the Adoption of Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management in Ontario, Canada

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Title: Identifying Municipal Barriers Preventing the Adoption of Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management in Ontario, Canada
Author: Ferguson, Andrew
Department: School of Environmental Design and Rural Development
Program: Landscape Architecture
Advisor: Perkins, Nathan
Abstract: ABSTRACT IDENTIFYING MUNICIPAL BARRIERS PREVENTING THE ADOPTION OF GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE STORMWATER MANAGEMENT IN ONTARIO, CANADA Ferguson, Andrew Advisory Committee: Nathan H. Perkins University of Guelph John Fitzgibbon Sean Kelly Green infrastructure (GI) has emerged as a strategic landscape approach to aid in creating more sustainable communities that benefit both people and wildlife. Despite the well-known social, economic and environmental benefits of GI in managing stormwater, many municipalities have been slow to adopt GI. To understand some of the factors impeding GI adoption this study conducted a comparative case-study analysis between two municipalities and two Conservation Authorities in southern Ontario with a focus on stormwater management (SWM). Interviews were conducted with four key informants and were analyzed using coding and theming. Results indicate a number of significant barriers including: a lack of experience by contractors in constructing GI projects, maintenance costs and complexities of GI, and the need for a cultural modernization within municipalities. The knowledge revealed through this study can benefit municipalities in overcoming barriers similarly experienced in municipalities in southern Ontario.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10214/10426
Date: 2017-05
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